TeaTimeSunday
TEA TIME in L.A. THE BRONZE / 3.20-5.22.02
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BOKE
Question for a Brit: When is tea time?


This ought to be easy to look up . . .
Posted by: forensicpopouri - Mar 20, 2002, 3:40 PM

... but I keep finding tea companies. <smile>

When is "normal" tea time?

And is "high tea" different?

Any other quick tea time info would be appreciated.


you speak



Responses


definition
Posted by: holywater - Mar 20, 2002, 5:04 PM 1 of 17

OK so I had to get my Oxford Pocket dictionary out but sotto voce means said in a low tone with underlying feeling......indeed it's an interesting thread..


<sotto vocce>
Posted by: forensicpopouri - Mar 20, 2002, 4:14 PM 2 of 17

Hmmm . . . I never thought the mere mention of "tea time"
would unleash such . . . such . . . thought-speaking.

NOTE TO SELF: Must work on vocabulary.



I KNEW IT !!!!
Posted by: soooztm - Mar 20, 2002, 4:11 PM 3 of 17

LOL hehehe


lol...
Posted by: Dawn - Mar 20, 2002, 4:06 PM 4 of 17

right now, tis.... 2 mins past nine in the evening. The delights of english televission are showing football (real football, its NOT called soccer, we created it, we name it. Of course, the early Brit football teams played with pigs bladders instead of balls....usless bit of imformation there.)

Yes, all us brits eat cucumber sarnies, everything is served with chips, and we all talk like Giles and wear tweed. We're all amazingly good at cooking, and the greatest thing to come out of our country is the national anthem. We all speak the proper queens english, no slang is ever used, with exception to the cockney ryhming slang thats so amusing. ANd we still dont use money- i traded my cow in for a new stereo this morning :)

heehee....:P

*Dawnie*



In return for keeping my illusions...
Posted by: Tallian - Mar 20, 2002, 4:00 PM 5 of 17

All you Brits can picture everyone in the US wearing cowboy hats, and having very bad manners.

While we're at it, let's picture all the Aussies acting like Crocadile Dundee.



That dastardly Kipling and his bloody cakes at 4:00 PM . . .
Posted by: forensicpopouri - Mar 20, 2002, 3:58 PM 6 of 17

Last time I pay him for secrets. <smile>


Don't spoil my illusions!
Posted by: Tallian - Mar 20, 2002, 3:57 PM 7 of 17

I shall continue to imagine everyone in England stopping whatever they are doing at 4:00 pm to get out the china and eat tiny sandwiches and buttered scones, with marmalade. While sipping tea.


all I know about Brits is what I've seen in U.S. movies <smile>
Posted by: forensicpopouri - Mar 20, 2002, 3:53 PM 8 of 17

... and surely movies never lie. <grin>

I know you guys are having tea all the time,
and keeping it a big secret. <ewg>

A tea spy told me it's 4:00 PM GMT . . . but
you never can be sure of what a spy tells you.

So . .. out with it. Tell me the secret tea time

Raising an eyebrow and slipping his hand into his trenchcoat.



tea time
Posted by: curses - Mar 20, 2002, 3:52 PM 9 of 17

if ur from london sometimes we cnt be bothered to say when are we havin dinner!
So we say when's it tea time or when are we havin tea .
It's a bit stupid .
i dano where u got high tea from i think some american prob made that up.
Also pls dont get the impression everyone talks like the queen coz we dnt most ppl have a normal english accent .Or a manchester or newcastle accent .
And Giles has a really English accent.
And we dnt say bloody all the time either



Tallian
Posted by: Miss_UK - Mar 20, 2002, 3:51 PM 10 of 17

Tea is just another word for dinner (sometimes lunch), or that's how it's now used. Not many people actually use that terminology anymore (well not any that I know).

Hope that helps



High tea???
Posted by: Buffygoddess - Mar 20, 2002, 3:50 PM 11 of 17

Umm..I'm british..and I have never had 'High tea' in my life! lol! As for tea time thats just like dinner time otherwise known as tea time for some ppl depending on where abouts you live in england is like 5/6ish when you have your evening meal...we're not really posh and everything and have tea with are parents like some ppl think! lol! Oh and just to tell you I hate tea! hehehe

anyways good question though...that has confussed me for a while and I live here!

xXx



l_mollon@hotmail.com
Posted by: tinytararocks - Mar 20, 2002, 3:50 PM 12 of 17

where i come from we call it dinner time.


Now its getting confusing
Posted by: Tallian - Mar 20, 2002, 3:49 PM 13 of 17

Miss UK and Dawn have tea but Tiny doesn't?


teatime
Posted by: holywater - Mar 20, 2002, 3:48 PM 14 of 17

Yes, I'd say teatime and supper are pretty interchangeable (5-7pm), although teatime could be earlier say 4pm and involve Mr. Kipling's cakes.....I'd have to ask my Mum to be sure (she's 70). How very British we are.....I feel all Giles.....


teatime in britain
Posted by: tinytararocks - Mar 20, 2002, 3:46 PM 15 of 17

in response to when tea time and 'High tea' is. Do u know anything about british people at all? we dont have a teatime.


...
Posted by: Miss_UK - Mar 20, 2002, 3:45 PM 16 of 17

Agree with Dawn, we don't have 'High Tea', not to my knowledge anyway.

Afternoon Tea/Evening Tea - Lunch and Dinner



heehee...
Posted by: Dawn - Mar 20, 2002, 3:42 PM 17 of 17

weird question.... dont really use 'high tea'... as far as I know, its an old fashioned, sorta afternoon snack with tea (the drink) and cakes, a few sandwiches- or am I completley wrong, guys?

Tea, for me anyway, is what I call my evening meal.... usually at about 6 or 7pm....some people have it earlier, some later, and some call it something completley different, like dinner, or supper.

Where did this come from?!:P

*Dawnie*




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