TeaTimeSunday
TEA TIME in L.A. THE BRONZE / 3.20-5.22.02
RESTORED ARCHIVE OF DELETED FORUM POSTS (NO LINKS OPERATIVE)
BOKE
CORKBOARD for Thur. TEA TIME in L.A. (#25)REMINDER: 7-8PM Bronze Time


CORKBOARD for Thur. Tea Time in L.A.(#25) REMINDER 7-8PM Bronze Time / 12-1AM London
Posted by: forensicpopouri - Apr 18, 2002, 4:04 PM

TTREF_25CB

THIS IS NOT TEA TIME. THIS IS THE CORKBOARD.
UNLIKE TEA TIME, THE "VERSE ONLY" RULE DOES NOT APPLY.
Use the Corkboard for messages to forensicpopouri
or discussion before or after Tea Time. And, yes, do
post comments, suggestions, insightful quotes, . . .


les victimes s'organisent
Supernatural lawyer

EOTD BtVS Episode Of The Day
#14/2.2 - SOME ASSEMBLY REQUIRED (2nd episode of 2nd season)

SOTD Sonnets Of The Day
#62-65/154 PARTLY LOVE (4-Sonnet Sequence) tid=75553

APRIL IS NATIONAL POETRY MONTH

PROSE POSTCARDS FROM FORENSICPOPOURI


* See "DESIGN DIARY" on yesterday's corkboard tid=74175

* The TERRACE is going TOPLESS (Marsters refuses to put on a sodding shirt) .<ewg>

* SONNET LESSON: (Correcting Rhyme Error )
Suggest a rewrite to fix the mistakes I made (when very sleepy<g>)
near the end of the 8-sonnet sequence: DO I HAVE TO tid=71591
SEE BELOW IN TODAY'S RESPONSES FOR TEXT TO FIX:

* ALSO SEE BELOW: . . . a "sonnet story" of . . . well, just look. <smile>

===
NEW TEA TIME GUESTS READ:
* TEA TIME FAQ & INDEX: tid=67836

* DESTINY (THE PORTAL, THE ORACLE, AND YOU): tid=59313
* YESTERDAY'S TEA TIME: tid=74917

REMINDER: Look for TEA TIME in L.A. at the top of the Bronze threaded
forums page at 7PM Bronze Time. Tea Time lasts one hour.

THE CORKBOARD APPEARS APPROXIMATELY 3 HRS BEFORE TEA TIME.


you speak



Responses


END OF CORKBOARD #25 ===================================================
Posted by: forensicpopouri - Apr 19, 2002, 4:15 PM 1 of 22

CORKBOARD #26 is up at tid= 77836
http://www.buffy.com/bronze_posts.jsp?tid=77836

NOTE: I will not longer be cluttering the CORKBOARD with
ton-o-posts. <smile> I'll put LESSONS in a different area.
"Design diary notes" ... etc. Insane ramblings . . . well,
you get the idea . . . in a special PERPETUAL thread.

In any case, once again. my thanks to all for your participation
as I work out the kinks. (Flooding the CORKBOARD with fp
is a kink.<g>) . . . You see . . here I go again. <g> SEE YOU AT TEA TIME
(if you're brave enough)<smile> POOF



hmmmm . . . .
Posted by: forensicpopouri - Apr 19, 2002, 1:16 PM 2 of 22

Looks like I pasted that little test of Friday's CORKBOARD into the
wrong window. <g> Unless something unusual happens, what you
see below is what it will be. In any case, OOOPS. <smile> Later.



test
Posted by: forensicpopouri - Apr 19, 2002, 1:12 PM 3 of 22

EOTD BtVS Episode Of The Day
#15/2.3 - SCHOOL HARD NOTE: Spike & Drusilla arrive!

SOTD Sonnets Of The Day
#66-69/154 AND THEN CAME TWO (4-Sonnet Sequence) tid=77213


= = = HAIKU FOR THE HOLY "C"

ELIZABETHAN SONNETS

Back in Shakespeare's day . . . schooling was rhetorical.
For the men, of course.

Queen Elizabeth . . . was a royal girl, of course.
She trained like the men.

At age eleven [?] . . . she translated French sermons  
into sonnet form. . . .

les victimes s'organisent
                      
from verse by Supernatural lawyer


= = = = = = DAILY NOTICES / MESSAGES

APRIL IS NATIONAL POETRY MONTH

PROSE POSTCARDS FROM FORENSICPOPOURI

* The "C" may want to look in the rearview mirror tid=75951

* prunehilda has donated her Kevlar to the "C." Which shall be put to good use.


= = = = = = GENERAL INFORMATION / LINKS

THIS IS NOT TEA TIME. THIS IS THE CORKBOARD.
Use the Corkboard for messages to forensicpopouri or discussion before or
after Tea Time. And, yes, do post comments, suggestions, insightful quotes, . . .


NEW TEA TIME GUESTS READ:
* TEA TIME FAQ & INDEX: tid=67836
* DESTINY (THE PORTAL, THE ORACLE, AND YOU): tid=59313
* YESTERDAY'S TEA TIME: tid=76553

REMINDER: Look for TEA TIME in L.A. at the top of the Bronze threaded
forums page at 7PM Bronze Time. Tea Time lasts one hour.

THE CORKBOARD APPEARS APPROXIMATELY 3 HRS BEFORE TEA TIME.



early link for Friday's Sonnets 66-69/154 tid=77213
Posted by: forensicpopouri - Apr 19, 2002, 10:21 AM 4 of 22

http://www.buffy.com/bronze_posts.jsp?tid=77213
NOTE: BtVS Episode 15 (2.3) . . . is where Spike & Dru come to town.



EXT. SUNNYDALE CITY LIMITS— PARK— NIGHT
Posted by: goodtvguy - Apr 19, 2002, 4:45 AM 5 of 22

A classic 1958 Dodge Desoto FireFlite crashes through the ‘Welcome to Sunnydale’ sign and screeches to a halt. A serious-looking lanky man climbs out. He’s dressed all in black, wearing a black duster, which creates quite a contrast with his bleached-blond, close-cropped hair. He has a bit of the James Dean rebel look about him. This is the notoriously vicious vampire, SPIKE. He strolls over to the curb and takes a deep breath while lighting a cigarette.

                                SPIKE
              Home, sweet home.



CODA
Posted by: forensicpopouri - Apr 19, 2002, 4:23 AM 6 of 22

les victimes s'organisent


The shibboleth of "the conspiracy"? <smile>



The Oracle says . . . (HR)
Posted by: ThePowersThatTea - Apr 19, 2002, 4:12 AM 7 of 22

Back in Shakespeare's day
schooling was rhetorical
For the men, of course.

Queen Elizabeth
was a royal girl, of course.
She trained like the men.

At age eleven [?]
she translated foreign prayers
into sonnet form.

It served her tongue well.
A woman of great power
not just by birthright.

I'd like ev'ry child
to learn to wield their tongue well.
Control their life's tale.

And all who join</g> me
in "the conspiracy" here . . .

. . . to transform the world.


POOF



AS ALWAYS <g> ONE LAST THOUGHT . . .
Posted by: forensicpopouri - Apr 19, 2002, 3:54 AM 8 of 22

The POWER of RHETORIC . . . is in its actual effect on the world.

ACT 1: Once upon a time I decided to fight a traffic ticket in that little
tyranny called traffic court where there is no jury . . . and
everyone said "you can't win."

RESULT: By the time I had "set everything up" (there is rhetoric in
scene setting<smile>) . . . the police officer stood up . . . and
solemnly told the judge that (to paraphrase) "I don't remember nuffin."
Judge's mouth fell open, flabberghasted. Judge smiled
and said "Case dismissed, "and asked me "if I had a problem with that."
And I said, "No, your honor.

ACT 2: For political reasons having to do with Election 2000
election fiasco (which I will not elaborate tonight<smile>) I choose
not to participate in the legal system (until the Supreme Court is
giving a good spanking) . . . but I got called for jury duty . . .
and still wanted to handle the "declining" as beautifully as
possible . . .

RESULT: After I asked for a sidebar . . . and attorneys and the judge
and the court reporter . . . retired to the judges chambers . . .
and I made a eloquent little speech about court proceedure in
two other states (regarding jury instruction) . . . yada yada yada
BOTTOM LINE: The judge sincerely appologized to me
for how he had to instruct the jury . . . and THANKED me for
the gracious (and careful) way I had handled the situation.
Excused.

What's my point? I'm a RHETORICIAN. Writing the
rhetorical sonnets are RHETORICAL (slayer) EXERCISES.

Nighty night.

FP



CONTINUED FROM BELOW (wrapping up prunehilda's sonnet and my IP desire)
Posted by: forensicpopouri - Apr 19, 2002, 3:41 AM 9 of 22

Not picking on prunehilda . . . just want to figure out
the thought processes of others trying to write iambic pentameter.

NOTE: But why does it matter? Well, it truly isn't just the rhyme,
but also the iambic meter that makes a sonnet "work."
I won't repeat what I've said before tonight (although it looks
like I already have<g>) . . .

BOTTOM LINE: Help me out on this. Open up your lovely skulls
and show me how your minds work. <smile>


Again, and again, and again . . . bless you for your participation
in this creative project . . . whereever it leads. <smile>

TOMORROW. (if not before <g>)



the beautiful minds of the conspirators . . . and their awkwark (iambic) feet <smile>
Posted by: forensicpopouri - Apr 19, 2002, 3:38 AM 10 of 22

BEFORE I SHUT UP <smile> HERE'S A PRUNEHILDA SONNET FROM TODAY

Hi FP This is the last time I will be able to attend TT It comes at a bad of day
Posted by: prunehilda - Apr 18, 2002, 7:10 PM 24 of 27
So follow along if you dare.#1


The Spring

While I've been staring at a backlit screen NOTE: Good IP
It seems that spring began in the Rockies. NOTE: wrong accent
A new sirenssong burst forth on the scene, NOTE: wrong accent
A resurrection of sorts. Don't mock please. NOTE: awkward accent

I can't reflect on what it's like elsewhere. - OK
Perhaps it could be far less dramatic - NO</bi>
But here the world can come alive with flare, - OK
Snow gone, sky blue: a motion picture flic. - OK

The grey and white world melts and becomes lush -NO
And soon brown branches pop with new leaf green. -OK
Fresh words come to my lips. Metaphors flush - NO
New life, new hope, new episodes unseen. - OK

The virtual world now; The terrace calls. OK but awkward
Under its spell the victims quickly fall. -NO

###

[MESSAGE TOO LARGE, MUST WRAP UP WITH ONE MORE POST]



AND FRIDAY COMES TO SANTA MONICA ============================================
Posted by: forensicpopouri - Apr 19, 2002, 3:35 AM 11 of 22

Just finished watching BtVS #15 (2.3) . . . which is when Spike & Dru
come to town
. . . A-MEN. <smile> I'll read through the script,
but then I've simply go to catch that 3 hours of sleep I missed last night
before writing Friday's rhetorical sonnets.

SO . . . let me make a few really quick asides to the most faithful
conspirators -- TWAOG & SNL.

SOMETHING I'D LIKE TO FIND OUT: Where the trap (?) is in
learning to "hear" Iambic Pentameter.


Since the first time I made (the out-of-the-blue) decision to write
a Shakesperean sonnet(having never cared much for Will's <smile>) . . .
iambic pentameter phrasing just seems to roll naturally off my tongue.

NOTE: That does not mean that I don't have to flip throuugh serveral variations
of what I want to say in my mind before choosing "the most fitting" . . .
but, generating iambic pentameter alternatives is just like . . .
well a computer CHIP <ewg> is generating the cadence.

[CONTINUED ABOVE THE LINE] <smile>



Thanks glow.
Posted by: Supernatural lawyer - Apr 19, 2002, 2:43 AM 12 of 22

Had my share of interviews too and never really enjoyed them. In my line of work, it's pretty much BS anyway; you have to pretend you absolutely LO-VE the firm you interview with (even if you've never heard of IT!). They don't even test your level of knowledge! They just make sure you went to the right school (which I did not, but I'm foreign so I get stamped "interesting!"). Aaah, the hypocrisy of my world! Thank God for the Bronze and TT!! Hey, if I get a job in LA, will I get to see JM shirtless and drink beer on the Terrace as often as I want? Ah, sweet dream!
Thanks for taking to respond to my post, glow. Your job sounds really interesting.
Did you read that prunehilda will not join us at TT anymore? (or maybe I read today's TT too fast). Will she be the first conspirator to fall, victim of tea time?



Oops that's maintain eye contact!
Posted by: glow - Apr 19, 2002, 2:20 AM 13 of 22

:o)


Thanks Supernatural Lawyer
Posted by: glow - Apr 19, 2002, 2:19 AM 14 of 22

Honestly I don't know how I pass any of my interviews. After each and everyone I feel like such a loser. But I do have some suggestions, firm handshake, maitain eye contact, smile all the time, laugh, make jokes if you can and if it's appropriate.

As for the interview questions, for my profession, ESL teaching, I took a course on how to apply and interview for prospect ESL teaching jobs, which really helped a lot. They gave us a list of practice questions that I went over before the interview. However, I was only asked one or two of the questions that were on the list and the rest of the questions I had to ad-lib. Plus, I was lucky enough to have had a meeting with my supervisor and the co-ordinator of the program about the program before the interview, so not all of the questions were a total surprise.

I hope that I have been helpful in some way. :o)



Hi FP, Hi glow, hi all
Posted by: Supernatural lawyer - Apr 19, 2002, 12:01 AM 15 of 22

Can't believe I missed TT again (and a topless JM on the Terrace!). I had an haiku all ready and everything... I really need to change my line of work!! By the way, glow any suggestions on how to succeed at an interview? :) I have a few coming up--including in LA... FP: will I make it in the "good old boys" town, with all my NEW ideas?

By the way, glow, I was reading your thread with Pleasant_Guest: congratulations on your new job!

Now on topic (more or less): glow makes a great point here. I was struggling with the IA and I don't feel so bad now (thanks glow!): maybe it's just not quite natural for my brain to process ideas in IP (unlike you, dear FP, ... you freak of nature!! <smile>). I am definitely a word person, but am still struggling with rhetorical sonnets. And the language barrier is not helping either... But like glow, I am willing to work at it. It may actually help me become more concise (yadi, yadi, yada... much?). Well, at least I can keep conspiring (that, I like, he, he) and, most important of all, learn, learn, learn. Thank you fellow Bronzers for giving me this new opportunity to learn. ... Ok, now I feel like a big sponge... your fault! <smile>



Forensic Popouri
Posted by: glow - Apr 18, 2002, 8:26 PM 16 of 22

I don't think I made my argument too clear over in Tea Time. What I was trying to say is that not everyone learns in the same fashion. For example, the school system: Schools choose one method of teaching, although teachers may impose their own pedagogy, they still must abide by the school's curriculum and methods. The method chosen is the one that is most applicable to the majority of students. Consequently there will be students who slip through the cracks because they cannot process information the same way as their classmates. That is why most if not every school has special education classes or tutors, etc., to help these students who learn differently get an education.

I think my example can be applied to your theory:

Within the sonnets
constraints lead to NEW thinking.
Not so in H.W.

You have discovered or created a process that helps you think in new ways. I don't think it is applicable to everyone. My brain may not be able to function in IP, but I'm not saying that I won't give it a try. I know that it will take lots of practice to reach the level that you are at, but then again it may not work for me. Also, perhaps because Hollywood is an "old boy's school" there is no room or allowance for new thinking. I guess that's why we have indie films, yet they are beginning to garner the attention of Hollywood. To sum it up, there are no absolutes in art, no matter what genre they appear in.

Off topic and to lighten the mood: Do you like hockey? I ask because the Canucks beat Detroit last night 4-3 and I'm so ecstatic!!! Woo hoo!

:o)



END OF LESSON ================================================================
Posted by: forensicpopouri - Apr 18, 2002, 5:27 PM 17 of 22

Feel free to disregard the Sonnet Training Exercise below this line.


(chuckling to self)
Posted by: forensicpopouri - Apr 18, 2002, 4:30 PM 18 of 22


An "engine" in a "stew" ?

GOOD LORD! <ewg> I swear I was asleep when I wrote that line.



P.S. Regarding the LAST LINE of the Training Exercise . . .
Posted by: forensicpopouri - Apr 18, 2002, 4:21 PM 19 of 22

Well, it's not "wrong"with regard to rhyme,
but I was tired, and surely there is a better way
to say what I had in mind. <smile>

If you can figure out what I had in mind <g>
(don't ask me, I only write the stuff<ewg),
you could try coming up with a better line
of iambic pentameter (with the same rhyme).

GET OUT YOUR RHYMING DICTIONARIES . . . AND BEGIN! <smile>



NOTES regarding Training Exercise below:
Posted by: forensicpopouri - Apr 18, 2002, 4:15 PM 20 of 22

1. There's nothing wrong with the last line,
it is bold because of an html oops. <smile>

The end-rhyme words that are in error are BIG and BOLD.

2 Remember that Shakesperean sonnet quatrains
are rhymed ABAB (alternating lines end-rhyme).



A SONNET LESSON (Training Excercise!) Rewrite these mis-rhymed quatrains
Posted by: forensicpopouri - Apr 18, 2002, 4:10 PM 21 of 22

FROM "DO I HAVE TO?" tid=71591


(8) THIS FINAL SONNET will try to regain

a touch of dignity about what's good.

A WEEK FROM NOW, our Buffy's back "insane,"

so in the present we rehash the past . . .


. . . but noticing when wings were bolted on.

The last show of the first half season flew

the first two times I watched it, evennow,

the perfect little engine in B. stew . . . .



A SONNET STORY about "the birth" of rhetorical sonnet
Posted by: forensicpopouri - Apr 18, 2002, 4:06 PM 22 of 22

COOL CONCISION
aka Public Debate in the Network Society (1)

(a previously composed rhetorical sonnet)


TO MY LONG ARGUMENT THE GIRL REPLIED:

“Well, yada-yada-yada. Hot air, much.”

My reasoning was clear, but she just sighed.

Her coolness had repelled my logic’s touch.


And those around us picked up her refrain:

“Hey, Yada-yada-yada, flap that tongue.

The more you say, the more you are insane --

with ev’ry sentence you climb down a rung ...


... of coolness factor. So just wag away.”

And so I shut my mouth to contemplate

a world where ev’rything you had to say

had to be short: concision must dictate.


And in the silence Shakespeare spoke to me:

“The next time you debate, speak poetry.”




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